Tag Archives: money

Bogleheads’ Retirement Planning: Self-Employment Account Options

A 401(k) for MacGregor? Muy awesome.

I had no idea that there were traditional or Roth 401(k) options for the self-employed. I figured that Greg was due to be stuck with only IRAs, as well as a tangle of alphabet soup even I didn’t want to swim in: SEP-IRAs, SIMPLE IRAs, Keoghs, spousal IRAs.

This totally changes our game plan, even though we won’t hop to a 401(k) immediately.

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Bogleheads’ Retirement Planning: Investment Policy Statement

This is the second of my Bogleheads’ Retirement Planning series.

“Investment Policy Statement” a hoity-toity term for “make a contract with yourself on how you’ll invest”. What’s your risk tolerance? What allocation of investments do you want to maintain? How often will you rebalance? What’s your goal? How often will you reassess your goal?

I’ve had these things in my head, shuffling them around as I researched and toyed with percentages and numbers. What they weren’t was written down.

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It’s Okay to Breathe

Gregory, looking properly industriousI just finished The Money Book for Freelancers, Part-Timers, and the Self-Employed yesterday, although the book was eye opening and (fer skerious) life changing throughout–I’m leaving it under Greg’s pillow, on his keyboard, and in his underpants drawer–one paragraph near the end caught my eye:

Return calls promptly. How many times has someone explained away a long delay in response with that lame excuse “I’ve been swamped”? Expunge this phrase from your lexicon. It’s horse hockey. Newsflash: it’s the twenty-first century, and we’re all swamped. If someone leaves a voice mail message for you, log it in and get back to them within twenty-four hours. E-mail etiquette is slightly different, we know, but even here you should set a high standard for yourself, such as committing to get back to an e-mail correspondent within one to three days. If you need to, set aside one hour a day to return calls and emails. (272-273)

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