Tag Archives: comics

Weekly Linkage: The Long Edition

At some point in the last 2 weeks, I had 0 unread items in Google Reader.

It was a short-lived, joyous experience, but this is the result of my web branching:

On small houses:

I totally hadn’t realized that tiny houses are illegal/violate zoning. I knew they were tricky to place, but I figured if you buy a patch of land somewhere, you could put whatever kind of house on it you wanted.
Continue reading Weekly Linkage: The Long Edition

Weekly Linkage: Passports, Robots, and Monopoly

This week’s internet cruising:

Weekly Linkage: Google, Politics, and Bees’ Knees

This week’s internet cruising:

  • Coding Horror: Trouble In the House of Google – Jeff isn't the first to point out the problems with Google's search results lately (the content mills are clearly winning, and I swim through a lot of mess to get good results anymore), but he's done a lot of due diligence to try to improve Stack Exchange's rankings over the content scrapers, with mixed results. Excellent post.
  • Sphinx – A better way to write your docs – This looks like an awesome doc writing/management system–I struggle with how much documentation to produce for the internals of a system (i.e. not a publicly exposed API), but I'd definitely play around with a system like Sphinx.
  • Buttersafe – Flowers – Bees’ knees!
  • Baptist Press – N.C. court voids same-sex adoption – What? What?! (Warning: Christian news source)

    "'Many homosexuals and their sex partners may sincerely believe they can be good parents. But children are not guinea pigs for grand social experiments in redefining marriage, and should not be placed in settings that are unsuitable for raising children,' Dailey noted in the article. He cited a study in the Netherlands that found the average duration of a homosexual relationship to be 18 months and that 'committed' homosexual couples have an average of eight other sexual partners each year."

  • Gay former service members praise Senate vote on ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ – latimes.com – "Carpenter, who comes from a family with a tradition of military service dating back to the Revolutionary War, thought that he would make a career in the Marine Corps. But when he fell in love with another Marine pilot, he decided he "couldn't continue living a lie" and left the military as a captain."
  • Hawaii-bound, Obama signals his opposition to gay marriage ‘evolving’ – Key quotes:

    "I still believe that it doesn’t make sense for us to provide tax cuts to people like myself who don’t need them when our deficit and debts are growing."

    "With respect to the issue of whether gays and lesbians should be able to get married, […] my feelings about this are constantly evolving. […] At this point, what I’ve said is, is that my baseline is a strong civil union that provides them the protections and the legal rights that married couples have. And I think — and I think that’s the right thing to do."

    "And that's going to require us cutting programs that don't work, but it also requires us to be honest about paying for the things that we think are important. If we think it’s important to make sure that our veterans are getting care that they need when they come back home from fighting in Afghanistan or Iraq, we can’t just salute and wish them well and have a Veterans Day Parade."

  • How to Take Control of Your Finances in 2011 – A solid recap of financial reminders for the new year.

Weekly linkage

Everything’s a day behind this week. I wanted these out yesterday. Anyway, here’s this week’s internet cruising:

  • The Little Easy – OMG, can I move into this house, please? Please?
  • White Bean and Onion Confit (recipe) – I'm totally going to try this. Healthy and yummy-sounding (although that's quite a bit of oil).
  • Graphic Designer’s Journey: Freelance to Freedom (Infographic) – Apparently I'm on a freelance kick today. This totally resonated with me. As much as I like people, client work can be rough. It's hard to maintain the cheerful and patient "service industry" outlook 40 hours a week. It feels much more satisfying to do your own work or select volunteer work, especially if you think your work has redeeming social value.
  • Aggressive Expansion: 8 Tips for Finding More Clients Now – I saw a lot of these techniques (sans the job boards) used to good effect at Skookum. Were I to go into freelancing, this would be an awesome guide. It's good anyway.
  • Winning a User Experience Debate – "To bring UX to the heart of the business, you must persuade colleagues to trust your opinion and expertise. Handling critique well is an important way to earn trust. It’s easy to undo your hard work with rash disagreement. Never dismiss stakeholder feedback out of hand."
  • YouTube – Speed Up Your Iphone backup with Itunes – Easily done. I was having 1+ hour syncs. Here I was (apparently) trying to be nice, sending in diagnostic info.
  • Reader Story: How I Purchased Private Health Insurance – I've thought about going independent myself with health insurance, just so that I won't be shackled by a job. That said, some companies offer better benefits than I'd want to pay for out of pocket, especially since I do need more than just preventative care on a regular basis… This article explores a couple of good options.
  • 22 seconds of joy – A confused puppy.
  • POD is Bad Business – An interesting perspective on publish-on-demand. It hinges on writers wanting their books on bookstore shelves. I'm not sure the argument holds as much water if you care more about online sales through Amazon (etc.).
  • Buttersafe – The Portrait – I almost peed my pants on this one.

The Gunslinger (Re)born

The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger BornThe Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born by Robin Furth

It’s been a while since I read the Dark Tower novels, but I was immensely impressed with the style and narrative of the first Dark Tower graphic novel. I don’t read much in the way of graphic novels, but I’m familiar with some of Peter David’s novels–yes, including the Star Trek ones–and figured the story couldn’t be too bad if he was involved in the adaptation of the series.

If the comic deviated mildly from the series in feel or details, I probably didn’t notice. I did definitely appreciate the faster and more consistent pacing over the novels. I wish the novels had been written with similar pacing.

The art hooked me first as I flipped through the book in the library. Lots of dark colors, lots of dramatic posing, and lots of glinty eyes. A bit over the top, but hell, it’s a comic. If it’d been more drab it’d have been too true to the novels. It was all gorgeous and gory and fitting with my imaginings of young Roland. The art also stayed marvelously consistent throughout this book–omnibuses are jarring when different artists were pulled in for individual issues.

The narration was the next big thing to hold my attention. Also a little over the top with the dialect, but it was more cute than annoying, and managed to not be confusing.

I enjoyed the presence of Alain and Cuthbert (who I barely remembered from the books), but the women other than Rhea were disappointing. Roland’s mother was a static Gothic figure, nothing more than a stricken-looking pawn between Roland and Marten. Susan… I hate to even get started on her. Her one flash of personality came when she threatened Roland with a knife, after which she went right back to being a whiny, powerless character. I can only hope she grows more personality as the series continues.

And yeah, I’m definitely getting my hands on the other collections in the series.

My other Goodreads reviews.

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