Tag Archives: tiny-things

Weekly Linkage

This week’s internet cruising:

  • Seriously? – bitquabit

    [H]e identified the Three “P”s of entrepreneurship:

    'Profits, people and…you can figure it out.'

    [Muttering amongst the audience.]

    'Women. People, profits, and women. Or men. Whatever. People, profits, and women.'

    No, no. He really means "Profits, people, and pussy." That shit's not funny.

  • BBC World Service – Outlook, Neda Soltani: mistaken for a dead icon – Heard this story on NPR on an early, early morning drive to work. This was fucked up; it ruined her life in Iran and sent her fleeing to Germany to avoid (further) persecution by the Iranian government. Continue reading Weekly Linkage

Fun Linkage

  • Errata Security: Confirmed: LinkedIn 6mil password dump is real – The updates on this are particularly interesting, as he writes about the speed of cracking passwords.

    Also, I want one of those video cards.

  • An Architect’s Guide to Color – Color is beckoning this season, and one architect is heeding the call with a plethora of new hues to tempt your house's palette.
  • Review: Sufan Stevens, Son Lux And Serengeti, ‘Beak And Claw’ : NPR – I picked up this album on iTunes and have to say that it's as quirky and cool as this review makes it out to be.
  • Linux computer the size of a thumb drive now available for preorder – "[…] the Cotton Candy, a tiny computer that looks like a USB thumb drive. The device, which can run either Ubuntu or Android 4.0, has a dual-core 1.2GHz ARM Cortex-A9 CPU, 1GB of RAM, and a Mali 400MP GPU that allows it to decode high-definition video."

    Shenanigans.

  • Bash One-Liners :: bashoneliners.com – I think this is incredibly cool. A wide variety of geeky tasks here.
  • Cruise Ship Didn’t Aid Drifting Boat, Passengers Say : NPR – "One of the other birders on the Star Princess was Judy Meredith from Bend, Ore. She says, "We all watched him for a bit and thought, 'This guy's in distress. He's trying to get our attention. And he doesn't have a motor on his boat.' We could see that."

    Old news, but that big ol' cruise ship probably could have saved those folks. Instead they kept on driving. Of course, I'm sure if they had changed course, some passengers would have been pissed at the delay in their journey.

  • Coding Horror: Speed Hashing – As usual, a good post from Atwood on security, if a bit sensationalist. Excellent reading on the article he links to, as well.

    I'll confess, Atwood (and the StackExchange user experience) has convinced me that (for now) OpenID is the best authentication method for SAAS applications.

Weekly Linkage: Flipping Friday

Greg and I are doing part two of our honeymoon this weekend with a visit to Pawleys Island. I’m not sure about the whole “arrogantly shabby” thing, but we’ve never been to a North/South Carolina beach, so it’ll be an adventure. I hope it’s not too cold for swimming.

…I might swim regardless.

Weekly Linkage: All Over the Place

There’s no particular theme to this week’s surfing, but there are some pretty pictures and good reads here.

  • The problem with waste – Note that the list of not-recommended screenings include things like screening for prostate cancer in men older than 75 or colon cancer in folks above 85. I glanced through the USPSTF's procedure manual, and it looks like they're taking into account a variety of factors (age, gender, race, etc.), but their information is only as good as the studies they're pulling from. How worried should we be about researchers' biases (ageism being the first that comes to mind)?

    "So we’re confronted with a set of screening recommendations with excellent evidence that aren’t paid for, and a list of screening tests that are recommended against that are paid for. That’s how you wind up with a system that (1) costs too much and (2) has sub-optimal quality. You pay for stuff that doesn’t clearly work and don’t pay for stuff that does."

  • The Tiny Life , Archive » E.D.G.E. – This is one of the prettier tiny houses I've seen, and the layout is simple but complete. I'm not sure how I'd finagle office space in there without taking over the living/dining/social area. Continue reading Weekly Linkage: All Over the Place